On Mates and Marriages: Navigating Conflict and Life as a Team

We have an enemy who leverages assault against all that God has created and approved. It may not surprise us that Satan opposes the image of God, in us as individuals, couples, families, and communities. We see the enemy launch divisive attacks on marriage generally, but we feel it when it seeks to dissolve our particular marital bond. Jesus, however, came to give us an abundant life in every area, including our marriages (John 10:10).

Trouble will present in the paradise we imagined marriage to be. Simply stated, our marital challenges will sometimes look like problems with one another. We may legitimately have issues that we need to work through, as any imperfect human and couple would in the process of becoming one (Mark 10:6-8). Yet, God still created our union to provide Eden-like pleasure and refreshment, with Him at the center.

If we peer through scripture’s lens, we will notice where the enemy operates through interpersonal challenges to shift perspective and pit us against each other (Ephesians 6:12). Conflicts will surface. Jesus warned that we would experience a variety of challenges in our earthly life (John 16:33). The Savior’s words encourage us to embrace the triumph He has secured on our behalf, despite the presence of trials (1 Corinthians 15:57).

With the Holy Spirit, however, there is always more to see than what meets the eye (John 16:13-14; Isaiah 11:2). We can look again, recognizing that God is working through our circumstances to produce spiritual fruit and build testimony. He can accomplish greater outcomes than we could imagine for ourselves, our mates, or our marriage.

As we encounter conflicts or endure difficult circumstances, our attitude has the power to enhance or eclipse the life God has designed and desired for us. Renewing our minds about our mates and marriages can help us pivot in a fresh direction. When we reframe our view, we can align our beliefs with what God wants. We also transform our behavior and discover greater dimensions of fellowship and intimacy.

With the Holy Spirit, we can submit the attitudes and perspectives that may be hampering our communication and connection with our spouse. While it may require our time, effort, and perhaps professional counseling, a couple can transcend from preoccupation with problems and antagonism to seeking and discovering solutions and embracing adventure.

No longer do we have to remain loyal to presumptions. Instead, we can exchange it for trust that the Holy Spirit is operating through our marital conflict, challenge, and circumstance to showcase the Lord’s glory (2 Corinthians 4:17).

Next steps.

Walking through marital conflict can be disheartening. Although the current conditions may not resemble all you envisioned, trust that God is at work in unlikely circumstances. As you endure this part of life’s experience, realize that the Spirit of the Lord has equipped you and your mate to see goodness as you work, live, and play.

Reach out to us today to schedule an individual or couple’s counseling appointment with a professional counselor through this site. This will support you and offer strategies that will heal and strengthen your marriage. With the Lord’s help, navigating conflict and life together as a team is possible.

Photos:
“Good Morning”, Courtesy of cottonbro studio, Pexels.com, CC0 License; “Disagreement”, Courtesy of Timur Weber, Pexels.com, CC0 License

6 Stress Eating Signs to Watch For

Stress eating is more common now than ever with the accessibility of so much food. In the past, when convenience, prepackaged, and fast foods did not exist, people had to farm or purchase fresh foods and prepare those foods before consumption. Now, reaching for a bowl of candy or a bag of pretzels for temporary stress relief is easy. We often do not think twice about it.

As many as 27% of adults turn to this practice, according to the American Psychological Association. Of the people who reported stress eating, a whopping 34% identified the behavior as a habit.

Are you concerned about stress eating?

When we are stressed out, we eat mindlessly while not hungry. For example, you are up against a work deadline and know that you will not be able to pay your mortgage on time if you do not meet it. As the clock keeps ticking, you reach for candy or salty chips for temporary relief. When you meet the deadline, you feel a sudden surge of relief and decide to reward yourself with more food, such asice cream.

Also known as emotional eating, it becomes a habit, and the brain treats the behavior as a reward. However, like any bad habit, you can resist, break the habit, and form new ones if you first acknowledge the negative behavior.

6 Stress Eating Signs

Are you unsure if you are engaging in stress-eating behavior?

The following are six stress eating signs to watch for. If these stress eating signs sound familiar, you can get help. Stress eating is a coping mechanism. Newport Beach Christian Counseling can help you find other ways to relieve stress without harming your health.

Rapid weight gain.

Due to the intake of unnecessary calories, you may gain weight if you partake in the habit frequently. Some foods contribute to chronic inflammation, which can cause weight gain and a “puffy” appearance. Pay close attention to the types of foods you reach for in stress-eating mode.

Intense urges to eat.

When you are hungry, your stomach feels empty. Your stomach might growl, demanding food soon when you truly need it, and you will eat almost anything to nourish your body. However, stress eating operates on urges and impulses. The draw toward the food is almost tangible. The intensity grows, often for a specific type of food. When we give in to these cravings, we experience temporary stress relief.

Eating beyond full.

Stress eating is a behavior that happens mindlessly. When you consume high-fat or high-sodium foods, your brain rewards you with feel-good chemicals that temporarily relieve stress. Unfortunately, these fatty and salty foods can make it difficult to judge when your stomach is full.

When you eat while not hungry, the stomach does not send the same signal to the brain, alerting you that you are reaching fullness. Eating beyond full regularly can lead to digestive issues, stomach upset, and acid reflux.

Hiding your eating episodes.

Are you embarrassed by your stress-eating episodes? Do you hide the evidence? Do you feel ashamed when you count the wrappers tossed into the trashcan? If you hide your stress-eating episodes because of shame and guilt, reach out to a counselor for help. Eating should never make you feel shame. Hunger is a natural response, but the urges from stress eating can develop into a bad habit that can be broken.

Yo-yo dieting.

If stress eating is something that happens regularly, then you might also diet frequently. This yo-yo dieting (strict dieting followed by stress eating and then resumed dieting) does more harm than good. Many times, your body will crave avoided foods while stressed. It is better to live with an 80/20 mindset. Eat healthy 80% of the time and allow yourself treats 20% of the time. This might help diminish the yearning for “forbidden” foods.

Preoccupied with food.

Preoccupation with food is another sign. It is mentally unhealthy if you always seem worried about your next meal or snack, whether you can get what you want, especially if you are stressed. Note: this preoccupation with food stems from an overabundance and an obsession. If you do not have adequate food at home to feed you and your family, reach out for help.

Break the hold food has over you.

Has your stress eating become a habit? Are you experiencing the negative effects of emotional eating? Contact our office today to schedule a session with a counselor in Newport Beach, California who can help you take the proper steps to break free from it.

Photos:
“Burger Time”, Courtesy of Szabo Viktor, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Burger Time”, Courtesy of Szabo Viktor, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Sandwich”, Courtesy of Haley Truong, Unsplash.com, CC0 License

Building Self-Esteem One Choice at a Time

Building self-esteem and increasing confidence starts with making the right choices at the right time. When we consistently make productive choices and act on them, we see a boost in our confidence and how we think about ourselves.

No longer do we believe the nonsense that we are not smart enough, attractive enough, or productive enough to get things done. We learn how to set goals and follow through, one choice at a time. Building self-esteem is a natural result of following through.

Building self-esteem and making better decisions.

Since our thoughts influence our emotions and behaviors, learning to discern between a poor choice and a beneficial one can help with building self-esteem. We will not always make the right decisions. However, that is a part of life and should be treated as a learning experience.

Try the following tips for building self-esteem and making better choices.

Learn from others’ mistakes.

The easiest way to make better choices is to learn from other’s mistakes. If you can learn the lesson from watching others, you can possibly avoid pain and heartache.

For example, if your father was obese due to uncontrollable eating patterns and suffered a heart attack at a young age, you may be at a higher risk of gaining weight and suffering a heart attack or stroke. You may want to learn how to watch your portions and engage in activities that will lower your risk. If you follow in the same footsteps, you might suffer the same fate or worse.

Many people remember the lessons they learned watching their parents and other family members and vow not to repeat those mistakes. However, sometimes these behaviors are ingrained in us and we repeat them anyway, despite our best intentions. A counselor can help you learn to break generational behaviors and addictions.

Learn the lessons from your past choices.

Have you ever repeated a decision as if you still have not learned the lesson? We probably all have at one time or another. You may make the same choice if your emotions get in the way of logic, or if you cannot think of a better choice.

For example, you might take back a spouse after they had an affair, only to have them do it again a decade later. Although logic may tell you that this is a behavioral pattern in them, you may allow your feelings for them to override the decision to leave and instead, take them back again.

Try to identify the same type of choices and ask yourself if this is a pattern. Is it a pattern of your behavior or the behavior of someone else? If you make a different choice this time, how will it boost your self-esteem?

Pause and think long-term before making a decision.

Before making an impulsive decision or behavior, ask yourself about the long-term consequences.

For example, it might seem like a good idea at the time to cheat on a final exam to earn a certification. However, what would be the long-term consequence? What is the worst thing that could happen? Perhaps the school has a program that tracks the exams and notifies the administration of potential cheating.

What if they disqualify you from the program and do not allow you to earn the certification? What if they report your actions to the next program you apply to? Would the derailment of your dream career be worth cheating on an exam?

You can apply these “worst-case scenarios” to any choice. You may find that a specific choice ends up being in your favor. Perhaps your company offers you a relocation package to a new city. The worst-case scenario is that you are miles away from your family. But, you may weigh the pros and cons and decide that the move will benefit your family far more and you can always make plans to video call and visit your family throughout the year.

Check in with your emotions.

Emotions are fickle. When we cannot control our feelings, we may act impulsively and make poor decisions that can lead to lower self-esteem. Before making a monumental decision, take stock of your emotions.

Are you feeling desperate, hurt, sad, or angry? Are you tired or hungry? Is your anxiety calling the shots? It can be difficult to make a proper choice when your emotions seem overwhelming. Instead, reach out to a counselor or close friend and explain the situation. They may be able to help you detach from your emotions to make an informed decision.

Getting help.

Do you struggle with your confidence and feelings of self-worth? A counselor at Newport Beach Christian Counseling can help you with building self-esteem, taking control of your behaviors, and defeating intrusive thoughts. Contact our office today to schedule a session with a counselor in Newport Beach, California.

 Photos:
“Woman Ascending the Stairs”, Courtesy of THIS IS ZUN, Pexels.com, CC0 License; “Wooden Walkway”, Courtesy of Nao Triponez, Pexels.com, CC0 License; “Balancing Act”, Courtesy of Dominika Roseclay, Pexels.com, CC0 License

Burnout, Boundaries, and Balance: Navigating Codependency at Work

Between deadlines and competing demands, responsibilities at work can destabilize us and cause us to feel overwhelmed when serving the marketplace with our gifts. This may encumber us with an unnecessary burden of responsibility, goading us into codependency at work, trying to save the world and our workplace.

Although there are tasks to manage, codependency at work can tempt us to overcompensate for the actions or inertia of others with personal investments of time and effort we cannot afford. Simply doing more doesn’t make us more productive or effective, but rather strains resolve if we continually extinguish fires outside the realm of our responsibility.

However, when we channel our resources into the pursuits where we are graced by God, we can experience greater fulfillment in the work that we do, individually and with others.

While we may be loosely familiar with how codependency sabotages relationships, its poison can also infiltrate our places of business. Codependency at work prompts us to reach past our colleagues, taking on what is not ours to carry.

It deprives others of responsibility and the opportunity to grow their gifts in the roles they serve on our teams. We may have good intentions, but a codependent desire to control environments and outcomes can actually work against us. It deconstructs the sense of teamwork that causes our places of business to thrive and be fruitful.

Burnout.

Furthermore, codependency at work has the potential to produce burnout in us. The lack of boundaries and balance leads us to assume more responsibility than we may be graced to fulfill. Instead of feeling accomplished, codependency at work strains us and multiplies resentment over time, resulting in burnout, decreased productivity, and sometimes an increase in low mood associated with depression.

Thankfully, we can revisit codependency at work by allowing the Holy Spirit to reset our vision concerning our role on a team. Just like the interdependent nature of Christ’s Body has many members, we must celebrate the value of each contributor, realizing that each teammate has a portion of grace, gift, and skill to devote to their realm of responsibility to benefit the whole.

Boundaries.

We need God’s wisdom to discern what is ours to own and how to make a distinction between supporting others at work without codependent control. When we ask, the Holy Spirit will help us to release such unnecessary burdens, nurture healthy boundaries, and build better balance in life and work.

We navigate it with the gifts and grace He’s given. His wisdom empowers us to assess and place boundaries around the time and energy we afford to people, projects, or pursuits. The Holy Spirit will reveal practical ways to revise boundaries at work to maximize our successes for God’s glory.

Balance.

God has privileged His sons and daughters with the ability to embrace His presence as we form godly decisions. He has also furnished all that we need to thrive in a godly and fulfilling life. Embracing this promise requires balance.

This doesn’t mean that everything in our lives or work gets equal time and attention. Instead, we follow the Spirit’s guidance in stewarding our priorities and resources while releasing others to flourish in the domain where they are assigned.

Help for codependency at work.

God is concerned with each aspect of your being. Your work life is not exempt. Where you may have experienced codependency at work, you don’t have to sabotage yourself, your career, or the places where you serve with your gifts.

Help is available, even as you scan this site for resources to overcome codependency at work. Schedule an appointment with a professional counselor at Newport Beach Christian Counseling to support you with recovering from burnout, establishing boundaries, and finding your healthy balance.

Photos:
“Collab”, Courtesy of Jud Mackrill, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Planning”, Courtesy of KOBU Agency, Unsplash.com, CC0 License

Past Trauma, Present Pain: Embracing the Path to Heal and Overcome

Fiery trials are commonplace in the lives of believers. No one is immune to feeling the effects as we grow, heal, and change. Like any human, we encounter a range of emotions and experiences that have the potential to shape our worlds. As we consider past trauma that may have negatively influenced our trajectory, traumatic incidents don’t have the power to predict our life outcomes in the way that a Word from God does.

Coming to faith in Christ shifts our destiny to produce eternal impacts. It also enables us to walk out our individual story with the Author and Finisher of our faith, despite the details of past trauma or its present pain. The Lord meets us in sorting through the difficulties that brought us to the present and remedies our soul ailments with His Presence, Power, and Peace.

Presence.

Jesus Christ is the Cornerstone that anchors the life of His Body, the collective of followers who have placed faith in Him as Messiah, Healer, and Deliverer (Ephesians 2:19-22). The beauty of the gospel is further revealed as we experience the glory of God shining through our broken places.

Trauma may have seared our hearts and scarred our souls, but none of that is outside of the Savior’s reach. Although the Lord Jesus Himself sympathizes with our grief, pain, and sorrow, He is unwilling to leave us in it (Isaiah 53:3). Here, the Presence of the Lord draws near, imparting us with grace, the supernatural strength to overcome what is humanly impossible and live more fully, as Jesus intended (Psalm 34:18).

Power.

Christ came to earth, taking on the frailties of the human experience. He endured every nuance of human suffering, yet without sin (Hebrews 4:15). The Savior remains our example, that despite the trauma of our past, we endure and overcome by the power of His Blood and the word of our testimony.

We can assert faith, even when we don’t feel it. Jesus’ sacrifice is enough to cover the damages incurred through our traumatic encounters. He will envelop us with grace to walk through the dark places of our healing journey, always accompanied by Him.

Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I will fear no evil, for you are with me; your rod and your staff, they comfort me. – Psalm 23:4, NIV

Peace.

Although we may have lived through excruciating suffering, we must remember that the empowering presence of the Lord lives within. He remains our present help, willing and able to console and guide us through every challenge (Psalm 46:1). The Holy Spirit is at work, even through the least likely journeys, to produce spiritual fruit or lasting evidence of our relationship with Christ (Galatians 5:22; John 15:16).

The Biblical concept of peace is more than the tranquility of healed memories or a feeling of closure, it is associated with having nothing missing, broken, or lacking in our lives. Though trauma has come to steal, the Prince of Peace has come to give us life and restore what we thought was impossible (John 10:10; Isaiah 9:6).

Next steps to overcome past trauma.

The Spirit of Christ embodies Jesus’ promise to always be with you, declaring that He would never leave, forsake, or abandon (Hebrews 13:5; Deuteronomy 31:6). Maybe others could not make good on those guarantees, leaving you in a place and position to suffer the unimaginable. However, the Lord’s abiding Presence is neither threatened nor intimidated by what sought to obliterate you.

Search the resources on this site and schedule to meet with a counselor. You will encounter the support and strength needed to overcome past trauma and heal from present pain.

Photos:
“Country Lane”, Courtesy of Julian Hochgesang, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Swing”, Courtesy of Kristaps Ungurs, Unsplash.com, CC0 License

5 Ideas for Christian Life Coaching

Christian life coaching can sometimes sound very general. While you may know you want to make changes, it can be hard to know how to do that in a meaningful way. A Christian life coach can help you deepen your faith, overcome challenges, and live a more Christ-centered life.

5 Ways Christian Life Coaching Can Help You

Spiritual growth and discipleship.

This focus in Christian life coaching aims to help you grow in your relationship with God. This is done by deepening your understanding of the Bible and developing a more intimate prayer life. Coaching sessions can explore different forms of prayer, offer help for studying Scripture, and discuss how to apply biblical principles to your everyday life.

Identity in Christ.

Focusing on your identity in Christ in Christian life coaching revolves around helping you understand and embrace your identity as a child of God. You and your coach may have discussions on self-worth, discovering God’s purpose for your life, and overcoming feelings of inadequacy. This is all done by focusing on a solid foundation in Christ.

Faith and decision-making.

Decision-making and walking in faith can leave many people stuck, especially when they face something difficult. Coaching for faith and decision-making will help you align your decisions with your faith and values. This can include guidance in making major life choices, such as career changes, relationships, and lifestyle changes. To accomplish this, you will seek God’s guidance and wisdom through prayer and discernment.

Relationships.

Relationships are a core part of who people are and how they go through each day. This Christian life coaching explores how to maintain healthy, Christ-centered relationships with family, friends, and significant others. Coaching sessions can cover topics such as forgiveness, communication, setting boundaries, and navigating conflicts to help you grow in your relationships while upholding Christian principles.

Purpose and mission.

Christians often seek a deeper purpose in their life. Coaching for purpose and mission will help you discover and pursue your God-given purpose and mission in life. With your coach, you will explore your unique gifts and talents, how to set goals that align with your purpose, and find ways to serve others so you can make a positive impact in your community.

Finding a Christian life coach.

While some people seek out a life coach, it is important to find someone who is appropriately trained to guide you in these areas. A Christian counselor can help you with all of these things. They are trained to discuss sensitive topics as well as share strategies and accountability for change.

As you consider what you need, think about these focus areas. Which ones resonate the most with you? Consider rating each one in terms of importance in your life. Do you need more help understanding your identity or do you need help with your relationships? No matter what you face, a counselor can help.

Your needs and journey are unique. These coaching ideas can be tailored to your specific needs and goals. As you meet with your counselor, you will work together to develop a plan that works for you.

To get started or learn more, our online directory of counselors here at Newport Beach Christian Counseling in California. The Christian counselors in Newport Beach will work with you to develop a therapy schedule that works for you. Christian life coaching aims to help you draw closer to God, live authentically, and fulfill your God-given potential.

Photos:
“On the Beach at Dawn”, Courtesy of Tasha Marie, Unsplash.com, Unsplash+ License; “Country Walk”, Courtesy of Frank van Hulst, Unsplash.com, Unsplash+ License

Seeking Help from Symptoms of Chemical Dependency

Gaining an understanding of chemical dependency and its effects has become important over the past couple of years in America. It is important to know what chemical dependency is, how it starts, and how one can get treatment.

Many families have a loved one who is suffering from chemical dependency. Chemical dependency is a person’s inability to stop using a mind-altering substance or drug because their body has now become dependent on it. This dependence is usually both physical and psychological.

Chemical dependency on a drug or substance is a result of continued use and the body’s ability to assimilate the drug and its tolerance is increased. People can get chemically dependent on narcotics, prescription medication, alcohol, or nicotine.

Because chemical dependency is a complex condition, diagnosing it can be hard. This is why The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) outlines the criteria for a person to be diagnosed.

The more criteria one meets, the more severe their condition as described below:

  • Mild Substance Use Disorder – 2-3 symptoms.
  • Moderate Substance Use Disorder – 4-5 Symptoms.
  • Severe Substance Disorder – 6+ symptoms.

Below are the criteria:

  • Taking the substance in larger amounts or for longer than initially intended.
  • Failing at any attempts to quit or control the amount of use.
  • A significant amount of time spent obtaining, using, or recovering from the substance(s).
  • Cravings or strong desires to use substances.
  • Inability to meet one’s responsibilities at home, work, or school as a result of drug use.
  • Continued use despite social or interpersonal problems.
  • Giving up or reducing social, occupational, or recreational activities because of substance use.
  • Recurrent use in physically hazardous situations (such as drinking and driving).
  • Continued use despite health or psychological problems caused by or exacerbated by substance use.
  • Increased tolerance.
  • Development of withdrawal symptoms resulting in the need to take the drug or substance.

It is important to note that diagnosis of substance use disorder can only be done by a licensed professional and a person should not self-diagnose.

Why it’s important to seek help for chemical dependency?

Its complexity.

Chemical dependence can be so severe that one can’t get clean on their own without the help of trained professionals. These people have a deeper understanding of how different substances interact with our bodies and minds and can come up with an effective treatment plan.

Multi-disciplinary team.

Chemical dependency affects many aspects of a person’s functioning. Seeking help will ensure that all areas are given attention and assessed. This could be a person’s mental health, physical health, or relational wellness. Treatment centers work with experts in different fields to offer comprehensive support.

It is life-threatening.

Dependency on substances can lead to serious medical issues that can contribute to health complications that unfortunately sometimes lead to death.

Renewed hope.

When a person seeks help it shows that they have hope that their situation will improve. Taking that first step is important as it opens a door to recovery and a more fulfilling life.

Restored Relationships

Our strength and quality of life come from the relationships we have. When one seeks help, they communicate to their loved ones that they are willing to be better. This gives way to renewed trust and relationship rebuilding.

We can help.

If your life has taken an unexpected turn as a result of substance use and you are looking for help, contact our office today. At Newport Beach Christian Counseling, we have trained counselors who can offer you the help you need.

Photos:”Fallen Leaves”, Courtesy of Klim Musalimov, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Fall Leaves”, Courtesy of Annie Spratt, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; 

ADHD and Anger: What’s the Relationship?

Anger is something we all feel and experience from time to time. Our response to it differs from person to person and depends on the situation. It is not necessarily wrong to feel angry. While most people might have the ability to respond to anger in healthy and appropriate ways, those struggling with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) have a harder time. Though not everyone experiences ADHD and anger concurrently, it is common.

Signs of ADHD and anger

  • Impatience.
  • Angry outburst.
  • Tantrums in children.
  • Irritability.
  • Lack of emotional regulation.
  • Defiant behavior.
  • Mood swings.
  • Relationship difficulties.

What can cause anger in people with ADHD?

For people with ADHD, anger can be experienced more intensely and thus interfere with day-to-day living. This is why it is important to understand the relationship between anger and ADHD as understanding aids in empowering those who struggle with it to minimize its impact on normal life.

Poor impulse control.

Executive functioning is responsible for skills like problem-solving, planning, and the brain’s ability to regulate emotions. The executive functioning of people who struggle with ADHD has been weakened resulting in their inability to self-regulate when triggered. This results in angry outbursts/temper tantrums or disproportionate emotional responses to situations.

Medication.

For those that have been put on medication as one of the ways to treat ADHD, sometimes the medication might have side effects that can cause high levels of irritability resulting in anger. An example is stimulants given to children.

Frustration.

People with ADHD can suffer from constant frustration, especially if they have hyperactivity symptoms. Anything that hinders them from quickly moving on to the next thing can be highly frustrating, like standing in a line that’s seemingly not moving and this can lead to anger. They have a low tolerance for boredom.

Impulsivity.

Most people who struggle with ADHD also struggle with impulsivity. This is taking action or reacting without thinking through consequences. Their anger comes as a result of not being able to take a step back yet again and suffering through the consequences.

Dealing with symptoms.

ADHD comes with a myriad of symptoms that make life difficult. This inability to function normally can be a huge strain and thus cause individuals to be angry with their situation and impatient with recovery.

Other comorbidities.

Most patients diagnosed with ADHD have co-existing conditions they have to contend with. These conditions could vary from mood disorders, anxiety disorders, depression, or behavioral disorders like Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD). Any of these co-existing conditions can exacerbate feelings of frustration and anger.

Relationship difficulties.

ADHD can impair how someone relates to the world around them and how they relate to society in general. Relationship difficulties can also provoke anger in those who struggle with ADHD since they also struggle with conflict management skills, empathy, or emotional stability, all of which are important for building and maintaining relationships. This can lead to feelings of inadequacy and rejection, which can cause anger and depression.

Stress and anxiety.

Having ADHD while trying to live life can be stressful and anxiety-inducing, This means that one is always on edge and easily irritated or triggered by the slightest inconvenience.

ADHD can also sometimes interfere with someone’s ability to plan and manage time. This means that they constantly miss deadlines which can be frustrating. They become angry with themselves and sometimes lash out.

Low self-esteem.

Low self-esteem for those struggling with ADHD can be due to feelings of rejection that are a result of difficulties in building relationships. In children, their inability to keep up with children of the same age as a result of their condition can contribute to them looking down on themselves. Feeling trapped by something they feel disempowered to control or change can be a source of frustration and anger.

Anger management for those with ADHD

As mentioned earlier, not everyone who has ADHD struggles with anger. However, for those who do, there is hope. There are treatment methods or a combination of treatments that can assist those who struggle with anger as a result of ADHD. Below are some examples:

  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.
  • Medication.
  • Anger management classes.
  • Social skills therapy.
  • Individual counseling.
  • Behavioral therapy.
  • Support groups.
  • Parental and teacher training (for support).

Next steps

ADHD is a condition that can be treated and managed with the right help. If you suspect that you or someone you love might be struggling with it and need help, do get in touch with us at Newport Beach Christian Counseling. We have trained therapists and counselors who can help you start this journey.

Photos:
“Researcher”, Courtesy of Rabie Madaci, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Work”, Courtesy of Getty Images, Unsplash.com, Unsplash+ License; “Navigation”, Courtesy of abillion, Unsplash.com, CC0 License

What the Bible Says about Change

Life is not stagnant; it is full of change. Throughout your life, you will have different jobs, churches, houses, cars, and relationships. There will be changes you choose to make as well as changes that are outside of your control.

Learning to develop a healthy mindset around change can help prevent anxiety around changes in your life. Holding fast to the truth will help you work through change trusting in God. Here are Bible verses that can help you through life’s changes.

God is constant.

The grass withers and the flowers fall, but the word of our God endures forever. Isaiah 40:8, NIV

God promises that he will not change the way that everything else in the world changes. As the Creator of the world, he is outside of the limitations that exist within the world. No change is beyond his scope.

Know therefore that the Lord your God is God; he is the faithful God, keeping his covenant of love to a thousand generations of those who love him and keep his commandments. Deuteronomy 7:9, NIV

God exists outside of time. He sees the bigger picture that we cannot see. Marveling at the greatness of God is a practical way to practice trusting that he cares for you.

Hold plans loosely.

​​To humans belong the plans of the heart, but from the Lord comes the proper answer of the tongue. All a person’s ways seem pure to them, but motives are weighed by the Lord. Commit to the Lord whatever you do, and he will establish your plans. – Proverbs 16:1-3, NIV

You can make all kinds of plans, but there is no guarantee that they will succeed. Make a practice of entrusting your plans to God and seeking him in prayer when you make plans.

You may be called to enact change.

“For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to your royal position for such a time as this?” – Esther 4:14, NIV

There may be things in the world that you want to see changed, and God may be calling you to start the process of change. To enact justice, and care for the needs of the community, you may need to lead the change for good. Hopefully, you will not be under the threat of death that Esther was. Look to her for inspiration to stand up for what is right, even when things seem scary.

You may need to change your mind.

Then a voice told him, “Get up, Peter. Kill and eat.” “Surely not, Lord!” Peter replied. “I have never eaten anything impure or unclean.” The voice spoke to him a second time, “Do not call anything impure that God has made clean.”

This happened three times, and immediately the sheet was taken back to heaven. Then Peter began to speak: “I now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism but accepts from every nation the one who fears him and does what is right. – Acts 10:14-16, 34-35, NIV

Peter was a devout Jewish man. Yet after witnessing the death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ, he was required to change his mind about a lot of religious rules with which he grew up. We sometimes need to make similar changes about our beliefs.

That, however, is not the way of life you learned when you heard about Christ and were taught in him in accordance with the truth that is in Jesus. You were taught, with regard to your former way of life, to put off your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires; to be made new in the attitude of your minds; and to put on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness. – Ephesians 4:20-24, NIV

Living life with God is living a life called to change. You are changing the habits of contempt, cruelty, and selfishness, for a life of compassion, generosity, and humility.

The change that happens within your heart and mind is slow, and you may not see the results you desire as quickly as you would like. Yet over time, God promises ”that he who began a good work in you will carry it on to completion until the day of Christ Jesus.” (Philippians 1:6, NIV)

If you need additional help navigating life’s changes, consult with a compassionate Christian counselor in Newport Beach, California today.

Photos:
“Winding Road”, Courtesy of Fabien Bazanegue, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Signpost”, Courtesy of Les Argonautes, Unsplash.com, CC0 License; “Winding Road”, Courtesy of Felipe Lopez, Unsplash.com, CC0 License

Caregivers and Caregiver Support

There are two groups of caregivers that are typically used to help those with medical needs navigate certain activities of life. One group is unpaid and typically refers to those who are family members or a friend of the person receiving the care. The other group consists of those who are paid by a company to provide care in the home. This second group can also include those who provide care in long-term facilities.

Each of these groups can experience tough situations that can cause anxiety, depression, or other physical, mental, and emotional strains. Most of the caregivers become attached to the person they care for, which can cause added emotions. When it comes to caring for family, people need to have access to caregiver support.

Common issues faced by caregivers.

There are common issues that most caregivers face and can present themselves at any time. Whether the caregiver is male or female, the issues remain the same.

Stress: It is common for stress to manifest itself when you have been a caregiver for any amount of time. It’s not necessarily the amount of time, it’s the weight of the situation that brings about feeling as though you are exhausted.

Isolation: Being a caregiver means that you spend less time participating in activities that you enjoy and more time in your role. This can cause you to feel as though you no longer have friends. There are times that you may feel like no one understands.

Anxiety: Sometimes it may seem as though the worries of caregivers increase. It could stem from having doubts about doing everything the right way for the person you are caring for.

Frustration: Due to the anxiety and feeling like you are alone in the entire endeavor, frustration can become an issue. You may find that you are testy and quick to become angry over small things.

Guilt: Being a family member who is taking care of a family member can make room for guilt to play a part in the anxiety you feel. You begin to think you are selfish because you want to take a day off and enjoy yourself.

Exhaustion: Being a caregiver day after day can leave you feeling like you have no energy to take care of yourself. You may find that you are so exhausted you have difficulty sleeping.

Depression: Taking care of a family member can bring you to a place of depression. You feel as though you aren’t doing things correctly. Sometimes you feel like crying.

Burnout: After being in the caregiver role for so long you could be facing burnout. You get the feeling that you are going through the motions and not making any difference.

Physical health issues: You may find yourself facing various kinds of physical issues. Headaches, stomach issues, blood pressure, fatigue, and a weakened immune system can be a few of the issues that arise from the stress of taking care of someone.

Substance abuse: It may have started as a way to unwind after a tough day of caring for a person, but it leads to dependency. Trying to get away from the situation through alcohol or other substance only causes more issues.

How to support a caregiver

Learning how to support a family member or friend who is in the role of caregiver is something that will help them and the person they care for. Everyone who cares for a person with medical needs should have access to caregiver support. Whether it is online counseling or someone who stops by to visit and encourage.

Take time to listen to them when they express that they just need someone to talk to. They aren’t necessarily looking for answers, they just need a connection with someone willing to listen. Let them define what they need. This could give you an idea of how to help them. Maybe they just need a break long enough to shower or nap. Sometimes a simple card of encouragement will create a new outlook.

Letting the caregiver know that you are there to help in any way will give them a sense of value. Make sure that they have access to caregiver support programs in the area.

And let’s consider how to encourage one another in love and good deeds. Hebrews 10:24, NASB

If you find that you or someone you know needs caregiver support, reach out to us at Newport Beach Christian Counseling. There are many Christian counselors in Newport Beach who can help you find the support you need while you care for your family or friend.

Photos:
“Dancing on the Bed”, Courtesy of Getty Images, Unsplash.com, Unsplash+ License; “Holding Hands”, Courtesy of National Cancer Institute, Unsplash.com, CC0 License